Etymology

Hungduan derived from the root word “hungdu” which means to proceed, pass, go through or traverse through. Hungduan, therefore, means a place where people pass through on their way to another place. In the early times, Hungduan was the main route of travelers from other municipalities on their way to Benguet and Baguio City. It is only more than a half day hike across the heavily forested border mountain of Bad-ayan to the town of Buguias, Benguet. The tribal Hudhud tale also often mentions hungdu as a stopping place for travelers.

Early History of Hungduan

During the Pre-colonial times, people in this western region of Ifugao lived a dormant life. They only think of survival. They only value two things: life and family.

Political system does not exist among them. Customs that they inherited from their forefathers governed all human relations. The customs concerning marriage, divorce, death, inheritance, sales, disputes, debts and crimes were respected by everyone.

They believe in gods and these gods were invoked during “baki” rituals, they posses no writing system that their daily lives was immortalized by their oral literatures.

Their future survival directly lies on their continued dependence on land. Their cultural practices on land acquisition or ownership, beliefs in the spirit, obedience in customary laws and rituals are the main contributors in managing their resources and nature.

In was only in 1870s that the Spaniards established military posts in kiangan and hapao to reinforce their garrison in bontoc and at the same time supported the mission previously established in these districts, In Hapao, the first commanding officer was Don Basilio de Plana with 20 soldiers stationed in the area. While there are only few written accounts on the Spanish activities in the locality, the presence of the old Spanish trails connecting kiangan and Hungduan and Banaue-Hungduan-Tinoc-Buguias are the only proof of Spanish influence in hungduan.

In the 1990s, the thrust of the American regime was the development of natural resources. They established schools and constructed roads using the old Spanish trails.

During the last stages of World War II, Hungduan was the center of warfare. the mighty Japanese Imperial Army led by the Tiger of Malaya, General Tomoyoki Yamashita, entrenched themselves at Mount Napulawan .To flush them out, the combined American and Filipino forces used bombs leading to the immense destruction of the rice terraces, irrigation canals and massive evacuation of the people, many of whom died of hunger and diseases. Hungduan’s population of more than 14,000 inhabitants was reduced to around 3,540 after the war.

Creation of the Municipality

In 1918, the administrative division of Ifugao as a sub-province of the old Mountain Province comprises only three municipalities namely Kiangan, Banaue and Mayoyao. The territorial jurisdiction of Kiangan covered the present areas of Hungduan, Tinoc, Lagawe, and Lamut.

In 1921, Burnay (now Lagawe) and Hungduan were separated out of Kiangan to become the 4th and 5th municipalities of Ifugao through Executive Order No. 6, s. of 1921.

In 1923, Hungduan became a municipal district through Executive Order No. 33. By then, the municipality was composed of fifteen (15) barangays, namely:

    1. Abatan
    2. Ahin
    3. Ap-apid
    4. Bangbang
    5. Binablayan
    6. Danggo
    7. Eheb
    8. Gumhang
    9. Impugong
    10. Luhong
    11. Maggok
    12. Poblacion
    13. Tinoc
    14. Tucucan
    15. Wangwang

On March 16, 1982 under Batas Pambansa Bilang 184, eleven barangays of Hungduan were separated to create the Municipality of Tinoc. Only four barangays were retained, namely Abatan, Bangbang, Maggok and Poblacion.

Later, under Batas Pambansa Bilang 327 dated January 19, 1983, the barangays of Hapao, Bokiawan, Nungulunan and Lubo-ong, out of Banaue were transferred to Hungduan in addition to the four (4) original barangays retained by Hungduan.

Moreover, Sangguniang Panlalawigan resolution No. 29 dated April 5, 1989, proposing the separation of sitio Baang from barangay Hapao was ratified on June 10, 1990. To date, with Barangay Baang created out of Hapao and Nungulunan, the municipality has nine barangays as follows:

    1. Abatan
    2. Baang
    3. Bangbang
    4. Bokiawan
    5. Hapao
    6. Lubo-ong
    7. Maggok
    8. Nungulunan
    9. Poblacion

The 9 barangays of Hungduan has 337 sitios with barangay Hapao having the most sitios (61). It is followed by Poblacion with 49 and Baang with 46. Barangay Lubo-ong has the least number of sitios (22).

Municipal Classification

By virtue of Department Order No. 20 – 05  dated July 29, 2005 prescribing the new income bracket scheme for LGUs based on average annual incomes for calendar year 2000-2003 as certified by the Commission on Audit, the municipality of Hungduan was re-classified from fifth to fourth class municipality effective July 29, 2005.

Brief Historical Background

DATE HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT
Before 1870s

The Spaniards established a military post in Hapao to reinforce their garrison in Bontoc and at the same time supported the mission previously established in this district.

In Hapao, the first commanding officer was Don Basilio de Plana with 20 soldiers stationed in the area.

While there are only few written accounts on the Spanish activities in the locality, the Roman Catholic religion and the presence of the old Spanish trails connecting Kiangan and Hungduan and Banaue-Hungduan-Tinoc-Buguias are the only proof of Spanish influence in Hungduan

1900s

The American government established schools and constructed roads using the Spanish trails.

1918 The administrative division of Ifugao, as a sub-province of the old Mountain Province, comprises only three municipalities namely Kiangan, Banaue and Mayoyao. The territorial jurisdiction of Kiangan covered the present areas of Hungduan, Tinoc, Lagawe and Lamut.
1921 Burnay (now Lagawe) and Hungduan were separated out of Kiangan to become the 4th and 5th municipalities of Ifugao through Executive Order No. 6, s. of 1921
1923 Hungduan became a municipal district through Executive Order No. 33. By then, the municipality was composed of 15 barangays, namely: Abatan, Ahin, Ap-apid, Bangbang, Binablayan, Danggo, Eheb, Gumhang, Impugong, Luhong, Maggok, Poblacion, Tinoc, Tucucan, and Wangwang.
1945 Hungduan was the center of warfare during the last stages of World War II. The mighty Japanese Imperial Army led by Tomoyuki Yamashita entrenched themselves at the vicinity of Mount Napulawan. To flush them out, the combined American and Filipino forces used bombs leading to the immense destruction of the rice terraces, irrigation canals and massive evacuation of the people.

The population of more than 14,000 inhabitants was reduced to around 3,540 after the war, many of whom died of hunger and diseases.

March 16, 1982 Under Batas Pambansa Bilang 184, eleven (11) barangays of Hungduan were separated to create the municipality of Tinoc. Only four barangays were retained namely Abatan, Bangbang, Maggok and Poblacion.
January 19, 1983 Under Batas Pambansa Bilang 327, the Barangays of Hapao, Bokiawan, Nungulunan and Lubuong,, out of Banaue, were transferred to Hungduan
June 10, 1990 Sangguniang Panlalawigan Resolution No. 29 proposing the separation of sitio Baang from Barangays Hapao and Nungulunan was ratified. To date, the municipality has nine barangays.